Anonymous asked: im sorry to be so dumb but whats going on in pakistan? what are they protesting??

walensi:

What’s going on: Protests, basically. It started off as a long march called the Azadi or Freedom march by PTI led by Imran Khan an opposition party in the parliament and the Inqalaab or Revolution march by PAT led by Tahir-ul-Qadri, a non entity in the parliament but someone who can pull crowds to himself. The march went from Lahore to Islamabad, the Pakistani capital, where they gave (and are still giving) a dharna, which I think is a sit in in English. These were all peaceful protests and the sit in was peaceful until yesterday, when the protesters started going toward the prime minister house after failed negotiations (and a lot more) and well, they weren’t allowed to go far because the police went in with tear gas, rubber bullets, and also in one instance, actual bullets. This has resulted in about upwards of 200 injuries and 7 people dead, 2 are critical, obviously again these are premature numbers and there’s likely to be a lot more.

Now, WHY: Simply, the march happened because of allegations of rigging in the general election of 2013 that led to Nawaz Sharif, head of the PML-N to come to power. The Lahore Incident, which is linked here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_Lahore_clash), read up. Generally, also non responsiveness to valid rigging allegations, and no sign of opening up areas where these allegations exist. A lot more.

This is a very, very basic thing. I skipped military intervention in talks, the sit in was on going for two weeks, a lot more basis for the march, the entry into the Red Zone, more events. You can google and keep up with this and ask me more questions if you’re still confused. This is also an on going situation.

If I messed up something tell me I’ll fix it. Add more to this if you want.

tagged → #pakistan #lahore #ongoing #protest
sept6cta:

#Sept6CTA, spread the word! September 6th will be a national day of community outreach and direct action.
Whether this means organizing a teach-in, a rally, a demonstration or a town hall addressing police brutality in a community space, we implore leaders to engage their families, friends and neighbors by taking action.
Find out more or volunteer at sept6cta.org.

sept6cta:

#Sept6CTA, spread the word! September 6th will be a national day of community outreach and direct action.

Whether this means organizing a teach-in, a rally, a demonstration or a town hall addressing police brutality in a community space, we implore leaders to engage their families, friends and neighbors by taking action.

Find out more or volunteer at sept6cta.org.

Aug. 26 11:55 am

justice4mikebrown:

quothtehblackbird:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Racists supporting Wilson cause further trauma. 

Smh.

"What I’ve seen of the Ferguson Police Department and their tanks, AR15’s, flash-bang grenades, tear gas, laser sights, helicopters, and military-style detachment makes me believe Michael Brown was tired. Maybe he’d been harassed by a police officer before, maybe he was tired of being tired. So when Darren Wilson tried to bully him, Michael Brown said no. And maybe it was the “no” of someone who’s been pushed around, which is a more beautiful “no,” since it is so clear and absolute. That a police officer then shot him dead and left his body in the street is, historically, the kind of thing police officers do when black men stand up for themselves.

And so for the last week I’ve been feeling that helpless feeling. All that’s left after helplessness is fatigue, right? Aren’t we all tired yet? We know that what happened to Michael Brown was not a unique incident but part of a larger phenomenon—and that it will happen again, soon. Which means we know an even deeper truth: that to be black in this country means constantly paying a tax on your life. Some of us pay in dignity, some of us pay in blood. What I’m trying to say is this: Never again will I pay with my dignity."

fileformat:

startorrent02:

konguloarkonan:

someone on metafilter figured out that the ferguson PD is running the support darren wilson gofundme

Just read through ALL of this…these people are INCREDIBLY organized and have collected almost every piece of information out - and they are asking some amazing questions.

yikes

micdotcom:

5 disturbing facts about police militarization in America

Those cops in riot armor beating and tear-gassing protesters in Ferguson didn’t drop out of thin air. As American police continue to receive billions in military-grade equipment free or subsidized by the Pentagon and Homeland Security, they’ve predictably started to act more like a military force in hostile territory than the public’s protectors.

Facts from ACLU report show just how big the problem has become Follow micdotcom

"

Far fewer articles describe the other constitutional violations taking place on the streets of Missouri, and those violations are every bit as urgent as the infringements on speech and assembly. We’ve seen very little coverage of the use of tear gas and rubber bullets as constitutional violations. But the due process clause bans the police from using excessive force even when they are within their rights to control a crowd or arrest a suspect. And tear gas is in a category all its own. Not only is unleashing it into a crowd an unconstitutional exercise of excessive force, but its use is banned by international law. That’s one of the reasons Amnesty International sent a team of investigators to Ferguson. Similarly, the use of rubber bullets under the circumstances is also unconstitutional. Some kinds of rubber bullets are more unconstitutional than others, because certain types are more likely to injure and maim.

But excessive use of force is only the beginning. Pulling people out of the crowd and arresting them without probable cause (or for being 2 feet off the sidewalk) violates the Fourth and 14th Amendments, particularly when those arrests are disproportionately of black protesters. The general arrest statistics in Ferguson reveal what looks to be a stunning constitutional problem. According to an annual report last year from the Missouri attorney general’s office, Ferguson police were twice as likely to arrest blacks during traffic stops as they were whites. Emerging reports about racial disparities in Ferguson’s criminal justice system and the ways in which the town uses trivial violations by blacks to bankroll the city (and disenfranchise offenders) all represent constitutional questions. Why don’t we characterize them as such? These are not just violations of the law or bad policy. These are violations of our most basic and fundamental civil liberties.

Of course, probably the biggest potential constitutional violation of all—and eyewitness testimony suggests this as a real possibility—is the alleged use of excessive force by the police in shooting an unarmed 18-year-old at least six times. Under the law, each of those bullets must be separately justified, as necessary, even if one believes the officer’s story that Michael Brown rushed him. To be sure, the news media has covered this, but very few of us talk about the shooting as a potential violation of the Constitution. Remember, the Constitution is the foundational bargain between the people and their government, the framework on which our legal order rests. When we fail to talk about the arrests, searches, racial profiling, and government brutality in constitutional terms, we are failing to capture how profoundly the state has betrayed its promises.

"

socialjusticekoolaid:

What they won’t show you on CNN tonight: Ferguson residents line a parade of roses down W Florissant, leading to where Mike Brown was taken from this world. #staywoke #powerful #insolidarity 

iwriteaboutfeminism:

The start of the school year in Ferguson was pushed back another week, to Aug. 25th. In the meantime, children are able to spend the day at the library or local churches.